Category Archives: books

A new contest by author Terrance Zepke

Check out this link to enter this week’s contest being run by author Terrance Zepke. It’s called Crazy about NC Coast. You could win an autographed copy of Coastal North Carolina.

http://terrancezepke.com/2011/09/19/crazy-about-nc-coast-contest-question-1/

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FIVE REASONS YOU SHOULD VISIT CAPE HATTERAS LIGHTHOUSE

  1. If you make it to the top, you can say that you climbed to the top of America’s tallest lighthouse.
  2. It’s an excuse to visit the pristine Cape Hatteras National Seashore.
  3. To see where and learn how the beacon (which is the equivalent of a 12-story building) was moved. A remarkable feat!
  4. Because it is one of the few lighthouses that permits night tours and full moon climbing tours (seasonally).
  5. The view from the top offers a bird’s eye view of the lower Outer Banks.

For more on Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and all the other beacons that dot the shores of the Carolinas, check out Lighthouses of the Carolinas Second Edition, by Terrance Zepke. For more on the author and her books, visit www.terrancezepke.com


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Win a copy of Lighthouses of the Carolinas 2nd ed by Terrance Zepke

Who doesn’t like to win?

Now’s your chance! Head over to author Terrance Zepke’s website and get the details about her upcoming contests. Next week, one lucky contest winner can win a copy of Lighthouses of the Carolinas 2nd ed. Don’t miss out. http://terrancezepke.com/

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FLORIDA: Give me an “F”, Give me an “L”….

F L O R I D A

Give me an “F”! Give me an “L”! Give me an “O”! Give me an “R”! Give me an “I”! Give me a “D”! Give me an “A”! What’s that spell? FLORIDA! Below are some words that help define Florida.

F Fakahatchee

L Lovebugs

O Overseas Highway

R Ringling Brothers

I Islamorada

D Daytona International Speedway

A Alligators

 

To learn more about Florida, read Florida A to Z!

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Guest Post: In Search of Good News by Bonnie Nickel

Bad news is easy to find. Whether it’s the economy, the environment, politics, or general societal gloom and doom, you don’t need to search far—it’s right there, in your face.

If you look hard enough though, it is possible to find good news.  It may not top the news stories, and you may need to turn over a few more rocks, but it’s out there. So that’s the challenge I’ve set for myself (and you, if you’re willing)—to find good news in bad times. And since I spend some of my time working on animal conservation issues I’m going to start there.

Tuesdays at dawn you’ll find me on the beach in search of sea turtle tracks, big and small. Early in the season it’s all about tracking the mama turtles to find the nests. Later in the summer we’re thrilled by the sight of tiny hatchling tracks winding their way to the water’s edge. I volunteer with the Coastal Wildlife Club (more about them in a later post) and the good news is that nesting numbers are up this year! Well, yes, there’s a caveat. They’re higher than last year, but lower than 10-15 years ago. But it’s still good news.

My small contribution pales in comparison to the work of others. Some turtle patrollers are out there 2, 4, even 7 days a week! That is good news.

There was good news for one sea turtle in another part of Florida last week. Andre the green sea turtle was given a second chance at life in the wild. You can hear the story here.

In this part of Florida we also have a fabulous wildlife rehabilitation center. The volunteers are amazing in their dedication and tireless in their work. We also have a hard-working group protecting shorebirds on our local beaches.  I’ll share more about both groups in a future blog.

And beyond Florida the good news just keeps coming…a Mexican bird park is re-establishing endangered species; Happy Feet, the wayward emperor penguin that washed up on the shores of New Zealand has 120,000 internet followers; researchers have a new tool to help document animals in their natural habitat (more details of this photo study can be found here);  and finally, new species of monkeys are being discovered—from titis in the Amazon, to snub-nosed monkeys in Myanmar.

There are people working tirelessly to protect and conserve species all across the globe. Yes it’s true that we’re the reason these animals struggle to survive. Whether it’s habitat destruction, air and water pollution, or repercussions from a warming planet, we are the problem. The bad news sneaks in anyway but I see it as another reason for each of us to participate in the solutions.

I’ll be spotlighting some of our local (and not so local) conservation groups in future blogs. In the meantime, take a look around your town. There are definitely people hard at work there too. We’d love more good news, so tell us what’s happening in your area. Maybe you’ll pique someone’s interest and we’ll create another champion for wildlife. It’s worth a try, don’t you think?

Bonnie is the author of Those Mischievous Monkeys (coming January 2011). She teaches people about conservation and sustainability—how to use less water, electricity, fuel, and other stuff—so that humans, animals (including monkeys!), trees, and plants can all share the planet and pass it along to the next generation. Originally from Canada, Bonnie now lives in Florida with her husband Jim and their two mischievous dogs, Cooper and Joie.

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August 9th is Book Lovers Day

A quick post in honor of Book Lovers Day.

Book lovers make publishing happen. So I’m sending a thank you to book lovers the world over. Thank you for your support. The book industry needs you like we never have before.

I’m giving a special thank you to @BookaliciousPam, who told me the great news about this special day in her tweet:”Happy Book Lovers Day! I will be reading and going to my indie to check out new stock. How will you celebrate?”

Please share with her and us via Twitter or in our blog comments. Hope you read some books today in honor of this special day.

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Myakka River State Park in Sarasota, Florida

This past weekend I visited Myakka River State Park. Myakka has this rambling scenic drive that is really nice, especially on days with low park attendance. It was perfect for this weekend since it was so hot! This visit didn’t yield a lot of animal sightings along the drive, but we did see some turkeys. There were groups of them on both sides of the road.

We tried the Canopy Walk which is a really popular part of the park, but didn’t make it all the way to the bridge and tower part because I mistakenly left the mosquito repellant behind. If I had been prepared, it would have been the best part of the visit. This is a terrific part of the park for kids because they all love the bridge which sways when people walk on it. The towers seem like they stretch high up into the air forever, and it’s hard to make it all the way to the top sometimes.

I did take a stroll along the Bird Walk though. In the right season, many interesting species of birds nest and congregate there. It’s really popular with birdwatchers, artists, and photographers. We did see a duck and some run of the mill birds, but nothing too spectacular this time. I would like to go back when it’s full of birds so the kids can get the full effect. The coolest thing we saw the whole trip was at the boardwalk though. A baby alligator! It was pretty dry out there, but we saw him slithering along and that was super neat.

Overall, Myakka State Park has been one of the best state parks I’ve visited. We publish a book by the park’s naturalist, Paula Benshoff. She’s a wealth of information and you’ll never meet someone who loves her job and its location so much. Here’s a link to that book, http://new.pineapplepress.com/myakka.html

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Conceptual editing for fiction, by June Cussen


Conceptual editing for fiction

There’s much to think about here. You can certainly make the artistic case that for fiction the editor must give a much freer hand to the writer. We are, after all, speaking about Literature here when we speak of novels. (Say: LIT-ra-chuh.) The writer is creator here, the God role. Who dares edit? We’ll keep that issue in editing fiction in mind as we go, letting it temper big decisions, being humbly aware that the editor did not have to face that blank page.

As always, I start with the reader. And these hard days you have to think of the reader as buyer. Who will buy this book? We covered that in earlier acquisition ruminations, but that too must be kept in mind by the editor as juggler. Three balls in the air: writer (Father), reader (Son), editor (humble ghost). So, as the editor considers the overall story of this piece of fiction, she must consider what reader it is aimed at (age, sex) as well as what genre it might be placed in. If it’s a literary novel, the writer may be more likely to prevail, if a genre novel like a Western or a romance or a mystery, the reader usually reigns. Of course there will always be the unclassifiable, and here the editor must step carefully, first considering that most authors feel that their work is beyond categorization. But I tell them, yeah, but librarians will do it anyway. Be prepared.

Keeping the reader in mind will help the editor make sure of consistency. This becomes more of an issue in copyediting where we have to remember to keep a character’s eyes blue all the way through the book if they start out that way. But even in conceptual editing, consistency rears its hobgoblin head. The tone cannot jump from deep to whimsical, serious to silly—unless of course that is part of the author’s design and it works within the context of the whole.

Story: that’s what a novel tells. Aristotle had it right with insisting on a beginning, a middle, and an end, with rising action, a climax, and falling action. The editor needs to make sure that the tension is created, holds, and is released. Beginnings are always hard. The writer has to establish the characters, the time, the place, the feel, and get us hooked into what’s going on without boring us before we get to the real action. Some writing guidelines tell the author to do that by first having a walloping action scene before anything else. Well, maybe. Sometimes that works. But I’ve read way too many manuscripts that start out with something either preposterous or truly awful in the attempt to hook us in. I’m usually just put off and don’t even want to read the rest.

The conceptual editor will have to make sure the whole story gets told, that bits don’t dangle at the end (unless this is a series and you want to hook readers for more). This is particularly true for mysteries. We have to find out whodunit, and it has to be consistent with all the details all the way through.

Character: They are people and must feel, think, and behave like real ones. Real ones aren’t always consistent, but in a story they need to be consistent enough to make the action work. The editor will note if a character suddenly does something out of character just to make the plot work. There’s always that tension between character and action. The editor will see that one does not exist merely to serve the other.

Editing fiction is a pleasure—the icing on the editorial cake—not that editing botanical keys is not tons of fun (wherein you spend days checking Latin names and learn the meaning of words like dentate and scandent). And working with fiction authors is usually a pleasure too, unless they take the God role too seriously.

Here’s my animal photo today. It’s turtle hatching season around here on the Gulf coast of Florida. This little loggerhead is heading toward the water. If you live near the beach, be sure your outside lights are off at night or little guys like this one will head the wrong way thinking your light is moonlight on the water.

Leatherback turtle

June Cussen

— June Cussen, Pineapple Press

@pineapplejune

www.pineapplepress.com

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Guest Post: The Grand Strand (Myrtle Beach, South Carolina)

One of the top vacation spots in the southeast is the sixty miles of South Carolina coastline that is nicknamed “The Grand Strand.” Myrtle Beach’s Grand Strand is more grand than ever, thanks to the many new attractions that have opened in the last couple of months.

The Myrtle Beach Boardwalk and Promenade meanders from 2nd avenue pier to the 14th avenue pier, allowing terrific views of the Atlantic. www.myrtlebeachdowntown.com

If it’s a pirate’s life for you, check out Pirate’s Voyage. Formerly the Dixie Stampede, Dolly Parton spent $11 million renovating the theater to create the ultimate dinner show complete with a buccaneer battle and pirate feast. www.piratesvoyage.com

Kids and adults alike will find plenty to do at WonderWorks, a new indoor family attraction near Broadway at the Beach. It a four-story building designed to look like it is upside down. The amusement park has 100 exhibits, including a simulated roller coaster and a virtual swim with sharks. The only outdoor attraction offered by WonderWorks is the Soar and Explore Zipline and Ropes Course. Soar fifty feet above the water on a course that travels 1,000 feet between towers. You can also try your hand at the pirate-themed ropes course that is more than forty feet tall and spans three levels. www.wonderworksonline.com

For a view that is 200 feet above sea level, be sure to ride the SkyWheel. This is a 187-feet Ferris wheel with forty-two temperature-controlled glass-encased gondolas. It’s the same concept as the London Eye (London, England). At night, it really comes to life with one million LED lights. There are a half-dozen other amusement rides nearby, including the Slingshot. These attractions replace the old Amusement Pavilion, which was built in 1948 and torn down in 2006. www.themyrtlebeachskywheel.com

For more on South Carolina, be sure to read Coastal South Carolina: Welcome to the Lowcountry by Terrance Zepke

Visit www.terrancezepke.com for more on ghosts, pirates, coastal history, and travel.

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Our June 2011 newsletter

Click here to download our June 2011 newsletter. Learn more about our upcoming titles and what’s happening this summer.

Pineapple Press June11 newsletter

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