Tag Archives: Ghost

Pineapple Press Ghost Books

Are you looking for Florida ghosts? Georgia ghosts? North Carolina ghosts? South Carolina ghosts?

Look no further! We sell a ton of regional ghost books that are sure to scare you.
Check out this link to learn more.

Here is a listing of our ghost titles:
Ancient City Hauntings
Ghosts of St. Augustine
Oldest Ghosts
Florida Ghost Stories
Haunting Sunshine
Florida’s Ghostly Legends and Haunted Folklore Vols 1, 2, 3
Ghost Orchid Ghost
Haunt Hunter’s Guide to Florida
Best Ghost Tales of North Carolina
Best Ghost Tales of South Carolina
Ghosts and Legends of the Carolina Coasts
Ghosts of the Carolina Coasts
Ghosts of the Carolinas for Kids
Ghosts of the Georgia Coast
Haunted Lighthouses and How to Find Them

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Best Ways to Explore Charleston, South Carolina, A Guest Post by Terrance Zepke

“Charleston is one of the most historic, prettiest, and haunted cities in America. Thousands of tourists flock to this Lowcountry hamlet every year,
but what is the best way to experience all that Charleston has to offer?”

Charleston Ghost and Graveyard Tour takes participants around the historic district, including a creepy cemetery. Hear stories about ghosts, superstitions, haunted houses, and voodoo.  My recommendation: Adults only.

Charleston Pirate Tours is a great way to learn about Charleston and pirates who plundered the area.  My recommendation: Perfect for adults and kids of all ages.

Culinary Tours of Charleston is a 2.5-hour tour during which participants talk to the town’s top chefs (plus see behind-the-scenes of their restaurant’s kitchens) and sample yummy Lowcountry cuisine. My recommendation: Adults only.

Gullah Tours with Alphonso Brown will educate participants on who the Gullah are and how they influenced the Lowcountry. My recommendation: Adults and children ages 12+.

Palmetto Carriage Works is the best carriage company because the guides are very knowledgeable and funny. A carriage ride through historic Charleston is a “must” for tourists, but be sure to do it before the Lowcountry summer is in full swing. My recommendation: Adults and children.

For more on Charleston, be sure to read Coastal South Carolina: Welcome to the Lowcountry by Terrance Zepke

Visit www.terrancezepke.com for more on ghosts, pirates, coastal history, and travel.

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The Lakeside Inn in Mount Dora, Florida, a guest post by Greg Jenkins

Spirits of an Old Florida Inn

The Lakeside Inn is one of central Florida’s best kept secrets. This modest Inn with its bed and breakfast charm, surrounded by huge canopy trees and resting on sparkling Lake Dora, is a true remnant of a more civilized time and culture from Florida’s past. Originally built in 1883 as a simple 10-room inn, it now offers Great Gatsby–like bungalows situated near the lake, a grand lobby and reception area, and the elegant Beauclaire dining room and Tremain’s Lounge. Guests desiring a brief escape from our fast and weary world will experience a fabulous, yet restful stay here. Although this lovely town offers many restaurants, antiques and variety shops, it’s the Lakeside Inn that serves as the brightest beacon to those venturing to Mount Dora…And apparently, it serves as a beacon for ghosts and other sundry spirits too.

The Lakeside Inn boasts of at least four resident ghosts. Reports of haunted experiences and accounts come from both staff and guests. Two of the spirits haunting the area in and around the Lakeside Inn are young girls dressed in costumes from various time periods. The first apparition is of a girl around the age of nine. She is believed to be Amy, a child who disappeared from the hotel around 1890. She wears a red dress and is seen standing near the lobby fireplace. Another spirit is of a girl around the age of twelve, seen sporting a blue dress, often seen smiling at a dining room table. She has been credited with moving chairs and chandeliers around the property.

Another spirit is that of a small man wearing a top hat. He has been witnessed walking through the lounge, and into the restroom, only to then disappear. Finally, there is the specter of a gangster who stares out a gable window. This dapper-dressed gentleman is believed to be the spirit of one of the many gangsters that stayed at the Lakeside Inn during the 1920s. Though he’s not dangerous, he is a bit intimidating to witnesses.

—Greg Jenkins

Greg Jenkins has close to 20 years working in the mental health and medical fields, and is currently a mental health therapist and case manager with several psychiatric and medical facilities. Since an early age, Greg has had a profound interest in the supernatural and fringe science, and after a personal experience with the unknown in 1987, he began his journey into the realms of parapsychology and all things mysterious. Greg is a folklorist and collector of oral traditions and urban legends, and is an associate member of England’s Society for Psychical Research. He has written a series of books called Florida’s Ghostly Legends and Haunted Folklore and Chronicles of the Strange and Uncanny in Florida. Reach out to Greg on Twitter @HauntedFolklore. His blog can be found at http://psiresearcher.wordpress.com.

LAKESIDE INN: 100 North Alexander Street ~ Mount Dora, FL 32757 USA

Toll Free 800.556.5016 or Local 352.383.4101

Email: info@lakeside-inn.com

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