Tag Archives: Publishing

Governor Scott Presents “Great Floridian” Award to World-Renowned Florida Author Patrick Smith

Patrick SmithPineapple Press author Patrick D. Smith, author of A Land Remembered has recently been presented with a distinguished Florida honor–the Great Floridian Award. For more details, check out this link on the Florida Governor’s website.

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Author Robert N. Macomber to appear at Bookstore1 Sarasota

Author Robert N. MacomberAuthor Robert N. Macomber, author of the Honor series, will be appearing  at Bookstore1 Sarasota on May 23rd at 6pm. He will be discussing “Freemasons and their 30-year struggle to gain Cuban independence in 1898, and the author’s experiences with their fraternity inside modern Cuba today.”

For more details: http://www.bookstore1sarasota.com/Events.html

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Pineapple Press 2013 Catalog

Our new catalog, featuring all of our titles, is now available.

We can send you a print copy in the mail too–just give us a call at 800-746-3275.

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Win a copy of Lighthouses of the Carolinas 2nd ed by Terrance Zepke

Who doesn’t like to win?

Now’s your chance! Head over to author Terrance Zepke’s website and get the details about her upcoming contests. Next week, one lucky contest winner can win a copy of Lighthouses of the Carolinas 2nd ed. Don’t miss out. http://terrancezepke.com/

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August 9th is Book Lovers Day

A quick post in honor of Book Lovers Day.

Book lovers make publishing happen. So I’m sending a thank you to book lovers the world over. Thank you for your support. The book industry needs you like we never have before.

I’m giving a special thank you to @BookaliciousPam, who told me the great news about this special day in her tweet:”Happy Book Lovers Day! I will be reading and going to my indie to check out new stock. How will you celebrate?”

Please share with her and us via Twitter or in our blog comments. Hope you read some books today in honor of this special day.

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Looking for Pirates in the Carolinas? A Guest Post by author Terrance Zepke

Look no further, you brave soul. They’re all over the Carolinas. Here are a few suggestions:

There’s a new Blackbeard exhibit at the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort, North Carolina. It has artifacts from the famous pirate’s shipwreck, Queen Anne’s Revenge. While the exhibit is permanent, the artifacts will change periodically. www.ncmaritimemuseums.com/beaufort.html

Check out the pirate museum inside Teach’s Hole on Ocracoke Island, North Carolina. The gift shop, which opened in 1992, claims to have more than 1,000 pirate-theme items for sale, as well as a small pirate museum. www.teachshole.com

The Pirate Voyage is an extravagant dinner show that opened in June 2011 at Myrtle Beach, South Carolina that includes a huge pirate battle. www.piratesvoyage.com

Pirate Invasion is a big, annual festival that takes place in Beaufort, North Carolina every August. Participants will enjoy a pirate attack, treasure hunt, face painting, music, special tours, and much more. www.beaufortpirateinvasion.com

Charleston was a big hangout for pirates during the era of Blackbeard. Take a guided tour to learn more about the Golden Age of Piracy and to see where some of them were hanged! The guide wears a pirate costume complete with a colorful macaw perched on his shoulder. www.charlestonpiratetour.com

Terrance Zepke
www.terrancezepke.com
Author of Pirates of the Carolinas and Pirates of the Carolinas for Kids

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Conceptual editing for fiction, by June Cussen


Conceptual editing for fiction

There’s much to think about here. You can certainly make the artistic case that for fiction the editor must give a much freer hand to the writer. We are, after all, speaking about Literature here when we speak of novels. (Say: LIT-ra-chuh.) The writer is creator here, the God role. Who dares edit? We’ll keep that issue in editing fiction in mind as we go, letting it temper big decisions, being humbly aware that the editor did not have to face that blank page.

As always, I start with the reader. And these hard days you have to think of the reader as buyer. Who will buy this book? We covered that in earlier acquisition ruminations, but that too must be kept in mind by the editor as juggler. Three balls in the air: writer (Father), reader (Son), editor (humble ghost). So, as the editor considers the overall story of this piece of fiction, she must consider what reader it is aimed at (age, sex) as well as what genre it might be placed in. If it’s a literary novel, the writer may be more likely to prevail, if a genre novel like a Western or a romance or a mystery, the reader usually reigns. Of course there will always be the unclassifiable, and here the editor must step carefully, first considering that most authors feel that their work is beyond categorization. But I tell them, yeah, but librarians will do it anyway. Be prepared.

Keeping the reader in mind will help the editor make sure of consistency. This becomes more of an issue in copyediting where we have to remember to keep a character’s eyes blue all the way through the book if they start out that way. But even in conceptual editing, consistency rears its hobgoblin head. The tone cannot jump from deep to whimsical, serious to silly—unless of course that is part of the author’s design and it works within the context of the whole.

Story: that’s what a novel tells. Aristotle had it right with insisting on a beginning, a middle, and an end, with rising action, a climax, and falling action. The editor needs to make sure that the tension is created, holds, and is released. Beginnings are always hard. The writer has to establish the characters, the time, the place, the feel, and get us hooked into what’s going on without boring us before we get to the real action. Some writing guidelines tell the author to do that by first having a walloping action scene before anything else. Well, maybe. Sometimes that works. But I’ve read way too many manuscripts that start out with something either preposterous or truly awful in the attempt to hook us in. I’m usually just put off and don’t even want to read the rest.

The conceptual editor will have to make sure the whole story gets told, that bits don’t dangle at the end (unless this is a series and you want to hook readers for more). This is particularly true for mysteries. We have to find out whodunit, and it has to be consistent with all the details all the way through.

Character: They are people and must feel, think, and behave like real ones. Real ones aren’t always consistent, but in a story they need to be consistent enough to make the action work. The editor will note if a character suddenly does something out of character just to make the plot work. There’s always that tension between character and action. The editor will see that one does not exist merely to serve the other.

Editing fiction is a pleasure—the icing on the editorial cake—not that editing botanical keys is not tons of fun (wherein you spend days checking Latin names and learn the meaning of words like dentate and scandent). And working with fiction authors is usually a pleasure too, unless they take the God role too seriously.

Here’s my animal photo today. It’s turtle hatching season around here on the Gulf coast of Florida. This little loggerhead is heading toward the water. If you live near the beach, be sure your outside lights are off at night or little guys like this one will head the wrong way thinking your light is moonlight on the water.

Leatherback turtle

June Cussen

— June Cussen, Pineapple Press

@pineapplejune

www.pineapplepress.com

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Our June 2011 newsletter

Click here to download our June 2011 newsletter. Learn more about our upcoming titles and what’s happening this summer.

Pineapple Press June11 newsletter

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Stetson Kennedy

We were saddened to learn of the death of Mr. Stetson Kennedy this past weekend. Here is a nice article from the New York Times about Stetson Kennedy’s great work,
and one from the great Jeff Klinkenberg.

Here is a link to his obituary in the New York Times. Below is a repost of a previous post about Mr. Kennedy’s work.

Stetson Kennedy is the author of Grits and Grunts, Folkloric Key West for Pineapple Press. He is a prolific writer with varied interests. But he is also a human rights activist known for his infiltration of the Ku Klux Klan. He’s really quite fascinating–there’s even songs written about him. Below are links to learn more, including how what he and Superman have to do with each other!

http://www.stetsonkennedy.com/

http://www.stetsonkennedy.com/gallery.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stetson_Kennedy

http://www.worldhistoryblog.com/2005/12/stetson-kennedy-and-superman-beat-kkk.html

http://www.woodyguthrie.org/Lyrics/Stetson_Kennedy.htm

http://flaglerlive.com/19904/stetson-kennedy

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The Ernest Hemingway Home in Key West, Florida

In honor of the release of the trade paperback of Hemingway’s Cats by Carlene Brennen, I wanted to mention The Hemingway House in Key West, Florida.

I’ve visited there twice. It’s a real pleasure to stroll through the gardens and visit with the six-toed cats. You get a definite feel for Hemingway’s life in the Keys during his time there. The house is also a nice stop between any bar-hopping or touristy shopping you might be doing. Take a minute to stop in and visit this landmark site.

I thought this video really captured the essence of the home.

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